Curro ne edar. (I run so that I might not be eaten.)

So Ms. Narden mentioned “Gaudeamus Igitur” because it was on a worksheet and proceeded to tell us that it was a lighthearted medieval school song. When I was bored, I googled the phrase. Apparently, the tune is quoted by Brahms in his Academic Festival Overture, and the main phrase/famous part, “Gaudeamus Igitur,” isn’t even in the medieval manuscript they found. 

Gaudeamus igitur
Juvenes dum sumus
Post jucundum juventutem
Post molestam senectutem
Nos habebit humus.

Let us rejoice therefore
While we are young.
After a pleasant youth
After a troublesome old age
The earth will have us.

Ubi sunt qui ante nos
In mundo fuere?
Vadite ad superos
Transite in inferos
Hos si vis videre.

Where are they
Who were in the world before us?
You may cross over to heaven
You may go to hell
If you wish to see them.

Vita nostra brevis est
Brevi finietur.
Venit mors velociter
Rapit nos atrociter
Nemini parcetur.

Our life is brief
It will be finished shortly.
Death comes quickly
Atrociously, it snatches us away.
No one is spared.

Vivat academia
Vivant professores
Vivat membrum quodlibet
Vivat membra quaelibet
Semper sint in flore.

Long live the academy!
Long live the teachers!
Long live each male student!
Long live each female student!
May they always flourish!

Vivant omnes virgines
Faciles, formosae.
Vivant et mulieres
Tenerae amabiles
Bonae laboriosae.

Long live all maidens
Easy and beautiful!
Long live mature women also,
Tender and loveable
And full of good labor.

Vivant et republica
et qui illam regit.
Vivat nostra civitas,
Maecenatum caritas
Quae nos hic protegit.

Long live the State
And the One who rules it!
Long live our City
And the charity of benefactors
Which protects us here!

Pereat tristitia,
Pereant osores.
Pereat diabolus,
Quivis antiburschius
Atque irrisores.

(vers. C. W. Kindeleben 1781)

Let sadness perish!
Let haters perish!
Let the devil perish!
Let whoever is against our school
Who laughs at it, perish!

I have massive dandelions growing in my yard. They’re in the back, over by where the neighbor’s yard starts. I was surprised, however, that some of the largest ones were much easier to pluck out than the little wimpy ones that grow in the fine, tangly grass. Did you know that roasted roots of 2-year old dandelions make an excellent, caffeine-free coffee substitute? I should try that sometime–you know what caffeine does to my bladder.

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4 thoughts on “Curro ne edar. (I run so that I might not be eaten.)

  1. you know what caffeine does to my bladder.
    ahhhahahha… Lu’s poor fragile bladder D:!!
    AHH DANDELIONS!!! DON’T LET THE SEEDS GO INTO YOUR HAIR BECAUSE THEY’LL GROW ROOTS AND GO THROUGH YOUR SKULL AND DESTROY YOUR BRAAAAAAAIN!!!!

  2. AHH DANDELIONS!!! DON’T LET THE SEEDS GO INTO YOUR HAIR BECAUSE THEY’LL GROW ROOTS AND GO THROUGH YOUR SKULL AND DESTROY YOUR BRAAAAAAAIN!!!!
    but… but they’re good to eat! in salad! ohgodi’mgonnadiethedandelionsareEVIL

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