Reading Seattle #5 — Greenwood Library

Date of visit: September 2, 2017 (ebooks were checked out sporadically)

I came here after a long soak and (anhedonically-received) scrub at the spa, so I was a little out of it. I probably should have gotten a beer at Naked City instead of thinking it was a good time to get books, as the four books I selected ALL turned out to be bad choices: they were all too dense, the type of book I think I read rather than the type of book I read, etc.

A week or so later, I realized that I was going to be on some airplanes soon, and would need a few books. I looked at SPL’s listing of available Kindle books, applied some arbitrary filters, and got a few. They were actually all winners!

For the sake of accounting, I will consider Greenwood visited, and try not to have to substitute with e-books too often — e-books are supplements in this project, where local visits and physical copies are key, but maybe e-books were fitting, as I was not at all local during this time.

Easy Way Out (Stephen McCauley) — A nice tidy story of the love lives of three brothers, told from the perspective of the gay middle brother, set in Cambridge in the 1990s. There are happy and sad anachronisms: the protagonist thought he would never be able to marry; on the other hand, the protagonist is a travel agent who fakes boarding passes and funeral excuses for his clients to make up for his procrastination.

Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War (Mary Roach) — Mary Roach is one of my favorite science-confectioners: this one was about interesting scientific challenges the armed forces encounter. In her chapter on food poisoning in the army, I was glad to learn that many soldiers develop Irritable Bowel Syndrome after an initial acute bout of food poisoning! This is what happened to me when I ate the bad mango, c. 2014.

Rory the Dinosaur Wants a Pet (Liz Climo) — Liz Climo is the best, dinosaurs are the best, and Rory is an excellent name for a dinosaur! Liz Climo used to work on the Simpsons (she’s only quit recently), and is a successor to Sandra Boynton, but more cute in the use of animals, and less (bad-)cute in usage of basic puns.

Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival from the Bottom of the Pile (Nate Jackson) — I skimmed through most of the football and just wanted to read the gory medical details; wish he’d talked about the rehab more. Concussions are discussed only in the last chapter — I guess Nate Jackson’s problems tended to involve muscles ripping from his pelvis.

Books returned: 9/26/2017 (I know, I incurred a fine)

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